Resources for Action

Search our curated resources collection to find the information and tools you need to take action and advance policies and programs that support infants, toddlers, and their families in your community or state. Resources include case studies that showcase what's working, steps for getting started, the latest research, information on using data to track success, and messaging materials to help you make the case for the importance of investing in prenatal-to-three.

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Innovation Brief: Mobilizing to Solve a Crisis For Long-Term Impact

In 2017, Pierce County, Washington faced the highest demand for foster care placement in the entire state—higher even than King County (home to Seattle), which has twice the population of Pierce County. The rate of entry into foster care in Pierce County in 2016 was 4.81 children per 1,000 children, compared with the statewide average of 3.75 children per 1,000 children. Of the 1,000 children under age 18 who entered the foster care system in the county, 25% were babies in their first year of life. Furthermore, data showed that Pierce County had higher infant mortality and maternal mortality rates than the state average, and only 43% of eligible children in Pierce County were receiving early intervention services. 

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Innovation Brief: Oregon Makes Big Promises for Infants and Toddlers

In 2018, Oregon’s state-appointed Early Learning Council asked their partners at Oregon State University to study the supply of child care slots for infants and toddlers across the state. A January 2019 report found that every county in Oregon, except one, qualified as a “child care desert.” Furthermore, when public subsidy slots were excluded from total state availability counts, the child care supply dwindled significantly. The study demonstrated two things: First, the situation for infant and toddler child care in Oregon was as dire as advocates had long suspected, and second, public investment did positively change both the supply and quality of early child care in the state.

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Integrating and Advancing State Prenatal-to Age-3 Policies: Report of an Expert Roundtable Conversation

This brief by the National Governor’s Association summarizes a roundtable discussion, aligned with current research, on how governors can explore policy and practices that create a coordinated support for young children and their families, including information about collectively developing a vision statement that identifies the elements essential to building an integrated state system of policies and programs.

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National Governors Association
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June 2016 Summary Report

As a Collective Impact movement, Bridgeport Prospers is building a civic infrastructure that includes a Core Leadership Team, an Operations/Implementation Team, nine key outcome areas, Community Action Networks (CANs), a Funders Table, a Youth Engagement Table, and a Data Table. Learn about their strategy and programs for supporting infants, toddlers, and families in this report.

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United Way Coastal Fairfield County
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June 26, 2017 Mid-Year Convening Research Summary

Collective Impact movements across the nation are anchored in the ability of communities to gather, access, analyze, and use data to improve outcomes for their citizens, including children and their families. Bridgeport Prospers uses data as the foundation for change. This research summary by United Way of Coastal Fairfield County and Bridgeport Prospers, Cradle to Career describes the progress of their community initiatives to support infants, toddlers, and families.

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United Way Coastal Fairfield County
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Key Components of a Successful Early Childhood Home Visitation System

Use this self-assessment tool for home visiting programs or adapt it for other prenatal-to-three programs. It covers needs assessments and program planning, professional development and technical assistance, partnerships and collaboration, public engagement, administration and governance, and financing and sustainability.

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Zero to Three
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