Resources for Action

Search our curated resources collection to find the information and tools you need to take action and advance policies and programs that support infants, toddlers, and their families in your community or state. Resources include case studies that showcase what's working, steps for getting started, the latest research, information on using data to track success, and messaging materials to help you make the case for the importance of investing in prenatal-to-three.

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Innovation Brief: Leaders Grow the Economy by Investing in Infants, Toddlers, and Families

Vermont employers struggle to fill job vacancies because of an aging population and the very low unemployment rate of two percent. These demographic factors affect the availability of high-quality child care for Vermont’s families, an industry that already struggles with issues of affordability, low availability, low wages for teachers, and low reimbursement rates from the state for subsidies. Let’s Grow Kids, a statewide movement to secure affordable access to high-quality child care for infants and toddlers, is working to address these issues. 

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Innovation Brief: Creating an Ecosystem of Supports for Infants, Toddlers, and Families

In Bridgeport, Connecticut, Bridgeport Prospers and community partners are implementing a multi-year strategy to increase the number of infants and toddlers on track for success in school and life by age three. This strategy focuses on building an ecosystem of supports rather than focusing on one single intervention and is grounded in the neuroscience of early development—which demonstrates the developmental importance of the first three years of a child’s life and the negative effects that toxic stress can have on young brains. While still in the early stages, this initiative holds promise for strong short- and long-term results because its strategy is grounded on the use of data, financial flexibility and innovation, strategic planning and communication, workforce professional development, and continuous quality improvement.

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Innovation Brief: Mobilizing to Solve a Crisis For Long-Term Impact

In 2017, Pierce County, Washington faced the highest demand for foster care placement in the entire state—higher even than King County (home to Seattle), which has twice the population of Pierce County. The rate of entry into foster care in Pierce County in 2016 was 4.81 children per 1,000 children, compared with the statewide average of 3.75 children per 1,000 children. Of the 1,000 children under age 18 who entered the foster care system in the county, 25% were babies in their first year of life. Furthermore, data showed that Pierce County had higher infant mortality and maternal mortality rates than the state average, and only 43% of eligible children in Pierce County were receiving early intervention services. 

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Innovation Brief: Oregon Makes Big Promises for Infants and Toddlers

In 2018, Oregon’s state-appointed Early Learning Council asked their partners at Oregon State University to study the supply of child care slots for infants and toddlers across the state. A January 2019 report found that every county in Oregon, except one, qualified as a “child care desert.” Furthermore, when public subsidy slots were excluded from total state availability counts, the child care supply dwindled significantly. The study demonstrated two things: First, the situation for infant and toddler child care in Oregon was as dire as advocates had long suspected, and second, public investment did positively change both the supply and quality of early child care in the state.

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Integrating and Advancing State Prenatal-to Age-3 Policies: Report of an Expert Roundtable Conversation

This brief by the National Governor’s Association summarizes a roundtable discussion, aligned with current research, on how governors can explore policy and practices that create a coordinated support for young children and their families, including information about collectively developing a vision statement that identifies the elements essential to building an integrated state system of policies and programs.

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National Governors Association
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June 2016 Summary Report

As a Collective Impact movement, Bridgeport Prospers is building a civic infrastructure that includes a Core Leadership Team, an Operations/Implementation Team, nine key outcome areas, Community Action Networks (CANs), a Funders Table, a Youth Engagement Table, and a Data Table. Learn about their strategy and programs for supporting infants, toddlers, and families in this report.

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United Way Coastal Fairfield County
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