Resources for Action

Search our curated resources collection to find the information and tools you need to take action and advance policies and programs that support infants, toddlers, and their families in your community or state. Resources include case studies that showcase what's working, steps for getting started, the latest research, information on using data to track success, and messaging materials to help you make the case for the importance of investing in prenatal-to-three.

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Showing 1 - 10 out of 142

NCIT Data Case Story

These case stories highlighting Boone County, MO, Kent County, MI, and Ramsey County, MN show how communities are bringing the NCIT Outcomes Framework to life through their own efforts, and how they are tailoring their approach to meet the unique needs of the children, families, programs and services in their areas. 

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Child Trends
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NCIT Data Case Story

These case stories highlighting Dauphin County, PA, Minneapolis, MN, and Tarrant County, TX show how communities are bringing the NCIT Outcomes Framework to life through their own efforts, and how they are tailoring their approach to meet the unique needs of the children, families, programs and services in their areas. 

Source
Child Trends
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Innovation Brief: New Initiative Makes Bold Asks for Infants and Toddlers

Start Strong PA, a coalition of early childhood advocates, launched a multi-year, statewide initiative in January 2019 to steer public funding toward infants and toddlers. The group collected data, engaged with the business community and providers, and brought forward a bold ask of $140 million over three years to support infant and toddler child care. During the first year, the state saw a 7.8% net increase in funding.

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Case Study: Using Evidence to Improve Infant and Toddler Child Care

In 2002, Miami-Dade County voters authorized a local property tax to establish The Children’s Trust to fund programs for children and families. Using new data and perspective built over sixteen years of managing the funds, The Children’s Trust refocused the county’s strategic efforts in 2018 to target those most in need within the birth to five age range: infants and toddlers.

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Innovation Brief: Mobilizing to Solve a Crisis For Long-Term Impact

In 2017, Pierce County, Washington faced the highest demand for foster care placement in the entire state—higher even than King County (home to Seattle), which has twice the population of Pierce County. The rate of entry into foster care in Pierce County in 2016 was 4.81 children per 1,000 children, compared with the statewide average of 3.75 children per 1,000 children. Of the 1,000 children under age 18 who entered the foster care system in the county, 25% were babies in their first year of life. Furthermore, data showed that Pierce County had higher infant mortality and maternal mortality rates than the state average, and only 43% of eligible children in Pierce County were receiving early intervention services. 

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Funding Our Future

This report provides early childhood leaders with funding strategies for increasing revenue from state and local sources, a largely untapped funding approach, to support high-quality early care and education.

Source
Build Initiative, Center for American Progress, Children's Funding Project, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, University of Maryland
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Funding Our Future: At a Glance

This report summary highlights the nine strategic and technical questions for early childhood leaders and their partners to consider when evaluating state and local tax revenue as a funding source for high-quality early care and education.

Source
Build Initiative, Center for American Progress, Children's Funding Project, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, University of Maryland
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Let's Talk Data!

When talking about data, it is important to have a shared vocabulary. This ensures that everyone involved in collecting, analyzing, reporting or sharing data has a common understanding about the process. This fact sheet includes common words and terminology used to describe types and levels of data (qualitative and quantitative) as well as measuring, accessing and sharing data.

Source
Child Trends
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